Evans-Pritchard Launches Goebbels Propaganda on Russia and the BRICS, Reiterates Murderous Intent
August 8, 2014 • 9:58AM

City of London Mouthpiece Ambrose Evans-Pritchard has now cast himself as the City's 21st century Josef Goebbels, writing blatant black propaganda against Russia and the BRICS. He is also signalling a very short timeframe for the effort to provoke the Russians into military action.

"The world faces a moment of maximum danger in Ukraine. Vladimir Putin has perhaps 72 hours to decide whether to launch a full invasion of the Donbass, or accept defeat and let the Ukrainian military crush his proxy forces," Evans-Pritchard scribbled in Thursay's Daily Telegraph. He declares that Russia is preparing to invade Ukraine, "This is more serious than the Russian invasion of Afghanistan in 1980.... Mr. Putin is expansionist, and far less predictable. He is, in any case, captive to the chauvinist fever that he has so successfully stoked.... The awful implications of this are at last starting to hit the markets."

He goes on to write that the West is winning everywhere and Russia is losing everywhere. He claims the West has enough gas in reserves for a year.

But his real purpose in this Goebbels-style piece is clear when he writes,

"The Kremlin is counting on acquiescence from the BRICS quintet as it confronts the West, and counting on capital from China to offset the loss of Western money. This is a pipe dream. China's Xi Jinping drove a brutal bargain in May on a future Gazprom pipeline, securing a price near $350 per 1,000 cubic meters that is barely above Russia's production costs.

"Pieties aside, the two countries are rivals in central Asia, where China is systematically building pipelines that break Russia's stranglehold. China has large territorial claims on Far Eastern Russia, land seized from the Qing Dynasty in the 19th century.

"Even if Mr. Putin's strategy of a Euro-Asia alliance with China succeeds, it will reduce Russia to a vassal state of China, a supplier of commodities with a development model that dooms it to backwardness.

"'It is a dangerous illusion. We are witnessing the funeral of Russia,' said Aleksandr Kokh, a former top Kremlin official.'" Evans-Pritchard fails to mention that Kokh, the "former Kremlin official" was a flunky of Anatoly Chubais and former privatization chief under the President Boris Yeltsin, and even he threw him out of the government.

True to his illusion that an economy is based on money, not physical productive capabilities, Evans-Pritchard also claims: "Nor can Russia retreat into Soviet autarky. It is locked into global finance." That's what he thinks.