U.K. Accused of Harboring Libyan Cleric Who Helped Aid Islamist Insurgency
August 31, 2014 • 8:54AM

The British government is accused of sheltering a radical Libyan cleric allegedly directing the Islamic terrorist opposition in Libya. According to the Guardian, Libyan Grand Mufti Sheikh Sadik Al-Ghariani also faces possible war-crimes charges for working from the U.K. to urge followers to overthrow Libyan government and help orchestrate the Islamist militia force Libya Dawn take-over of Tripoli.

See EIR's 'Put Britain on the List of States Sponsoring Terrorism.'

On a day when David Cameron warned of the "greater and deeper threat to our security than we have known before" from Islamist extremists, and announced tougher measures to deal with the terrorist threat, the Foreign Office confirmed that Ghariani was residing in Exeter, from where he is encouraging his followers to overthrow the Libyan government. The day after Tripoli fell to Libya Dawn, Ghariani sent congratulations to the Islamist militants using his Internet channel, Tanasuh: "I congratulate the revolutionaries in their victory, I give blessing to the martyrs."

U.S offical circles are said to be furious, since Ghariani, from his British safehouse, in June praised Ansar al Sharia, the terrorist group that killed U.S. ambassador Chris Stevens in Benghazi on 9/11 in 2012.

Ghariani is also facing a potential war-crimes investigation, because the UN Security Council this week issued a sharply worded resolution demanding a ceasefire and threatening indictments for those inciting the militancy.

U.K. shadow immigration minister David Hanson blasted the Cameron government, saying: "The Home Secretary has serious questions to answer about whether someone whom it is alleged has breached a UN war crime resolution is resident in this country, and how the Home Office has decided that his presence here will be beneficial to the U.K..... There are very serious allegations about someone that has been given permission to enter the country and the Home Secretary needs to explain how he was able to travel here and continue to seemingly instigate action in Tripoli." A Foreign Office spokesman confirmed that Ghariani was in the U.K., but made the excuse, "He wasn't invited by us. Our understanding is it's a private visit." The Home Office said: "We do not routinely comment on individual cases. But we are clear that those who seek to foster hatred or promote terrorism are not welcome in the United Kingdom. We will take action against those who represent to our society or seek to subvert our shared values. All cases are kept under review."